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Home is where the heart is

12 Sep 2017 | 180 View

Home is where the heart is

Brie brings it all back home

The brand new Hollywood drama The Glass Castle is a truly remarkable story. It takes us on an emotional journey through Walls’s childhood and her relationship with her strange, poverty-stricken family.

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Home is where the heart is

Tatat Bunnag

All families have their quirks. But few families are as unusual as Jeannette Walls’s. Based on the New York journalist’s best-selling 2005 memoir, the brand new Hollywood drama The Glass Castle is a truly remarkable story. It takes us on an emotional journey through Walls’s childhood and her relationship with her strange, poverty-stricken family.

The film stars Brie Larson who attracted rave reviews for her Academy Award-winning performance in the 2015 film Room. As the adult Jeannette, she movingly portrays the daughter’s troubled relationship with her well-meaning alcoholic father Rex (Woody Harrelson) and eccentric mother Rose Mary (Naomi Watts).

Ahead of The Glass Castle’s release on September 7, Sahamongkol Film arranged an exclusive email interview with Brie, where she told us about Jeannette Walls’s unusual story.

What is it about the story that appealed to you?

Brie: It’s an interesting film about family. Although it’s clearly a very specific story, there’s so much in it that feels universal. I think ultimately what I like about it is that it’s about surviving. It teaches you that you can’t pick and choose what parts of life you want to live. But you can learn to forgive. I tried my best to bring the character to life.

What’s the meaning behind the title?

Brie: Jeannette’s father, Rex, makes a promise that he’ll one day build a dream house for his family in the desert. He calls it “The Glass Castle.” He works out the design and carries around the blueprints everywhere he goes. But he doesn’t have the money to build it.

How much was Walls involved in the process of making the film?

Brie: She came to the set a couple of times. And she made herself available to answer all of the many questions that we had during the shoot.

What was the atmosphere like on set?

Brie: We just had fun to be honest. I know it’s hard to imagine, but usually the atmosphere on the set of a dramatic film is less serious. I guess it’s a way to defuse the tension. Humour is a great way to deal with serious feelings. After a scene in which we’d all been crying, we’d tell each other jokes and get each other laughing.

This was your second film with director Destin Daniel Cretton. How was it to work together again?

Brie: It was great. The first film we did together was a low budget independent feature called Short Term 12 a few years ago. We’ve both come a long way since then. He’s a great director who really understands his actors.

The Glass Castle is set in the 80s. Do you think the current generation can relate to a story based in that period?

Brie: Jeannette comes to New York to get away from her past, but in the end she can never forget her family. I think this is something that anybody can relate to, no matter which generation you’re from. Sometimes you want to get away from your family in order to find out who you really are. But that journey usually leads you home in the end.

Video from https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvDEZaCuyNv50odPYXrNjLA